Fighting Cancer With Loyalty To People – Dr. Clay Siegall

The field of medicine is arguably the most important industry on the planet. This is where significant discoveries that have helped humans double their lifespan over the last 400 years have been made. So, when a doctor dedicates their entire existence to the cause of helping others, it is hard to find words to compliment them appropriately. One such individual is Dr. Clay Siegall.

Background

Dr. Siegall graduated with a Ph.D. Degree in Genetics from George Washington University. In 1998, he co-founded his company Seattle Genetics where he has been a CEO for 15 years. A description of his performance is given by the fact that his company’s stock price tripled in only five years. Furthermore, they have been a platform for Siegall to fight cancer. The research he conducted made some groundbreaking discoveries, including a creation of a new medicine.

Adcetris

Dr. Siegall led his company to the discovery of the first antibody-drug conjugates, approved by the FDA six years ago. Presently, this medicine is available to over 60 countries worldwide. His main duty throughout the process of establishing this drug was working with the FDA to get the drug approved. Another example of a job role he has undertaken was fundraising more than a billion dollars for his company.

Other Notable Achievements

By helping medicine progress, Dr. Siegall earned the University of Maryland Alumnus of the Year award in 2013. A year before that, one of the four largest accounting firms in the world, Ernst & Young, gave him the Pacific Northwest Entrepreneur of the Year award. At the moment, he holds 15 patents from the field of medicine and more of these are anticipated as he keeps making discoveries.

Publications

Besides being on multiple editorial boards for large scientific journals, he has personally written over 70 peer-reviewed articles. He encourages other scientists, which may or may not share the same points of view, to discuss the progress of medicine in one of the journals that he is a member of. Finally, if Dr. Siegall was not around, cancer research and medicine might have been years behind.